For GCRG Only

Assessing the spatial variability in peak season CO 2 exchange characteristics across the Arctic tundra using a light response curve parameterization

Assessing the spatial variability in peak season CO 2 exchange characteristics across the Arctic tundra using a light response curve parameterization.

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Impacts of Conversion and Drainage of Tropical Peat Forests on Carbon Fluxes to Atmosphere and Water

Indonesia has the largest tropical peats, ranging from 18 to 27 million hectares. It is estimated that about 12 million hectares of these peats have been disturbed and substantially drained in order to lower water table depths which are required for agricultural uses (i.e. rice paddy, industrial pulp, and recently oil palm plantation). Drained . . . → Read More: Impacts of Conversion and Drainage of Tropical Peat Forests on Carbon Fluxes to Atmosphere and Water

Seasonal and Inter-Annual Controls on CO2 Flux in Arctic Alaska

The Arctic landscape holds massive potential to affect the global carbon balance. Soils of the northern permafrost region account for approximately 50 percent of the estimated global below-ground organic carbon pool. The total soil organic carbon in the first 3 m in northern circumpolar permafrost, excluding yedoma, is ca.1024 PgC. Under a projected warmer . . . → Read More: Seasonal and Inter-Annual Controls on CO2 Flux in Arctic Alaska

Seasonal Variations of Trace Gas Flux in Mangrove Ecosystem in Baja California Sur, Mexico

IMGA0110

Anthropogenic activities have disrupted biogeochemical cycles with subsequent increases in the emission of radiatively important trace gases. Wetlands are natural sources of CO2, CH4 and N2O with seasonal variations in anthropogenic inputs, temperature, salinity, and water modulating emissions. Variations in trace gas flux in mangrove ecosystems using eddy covariance, soil coring, leaf litter sampling, . . . → Read More: Seasonal Variations of Trace Gas Flux in Mangrove Ecosystem in Baja California Sur, Mexico

Land-atmosphere carbon fluxes along a thaw-lake chronosequence on the Arctic Coastal Plain of Alaska

Thaw lakes and vegetated thaw lake basins (VTLBs) are common features in permafrost zones and can comprise a large proportion of the land surface [1-7] (Figure 1). Thaw lakes on the Arctic Coastal Plain (ACP) of Alaska are estimated to have begun forming approximately 10,000 years ago in the Holocene when the climate was . . . → Read More: Land-atmosphere carbon fluxes along a thaw-lake chronosequence on the Arctic Coastal Plain of Alaska

Vertical and Lateral Carbon Flux in a Larrea/Cardon Ecosystem near La Paz, BCS, Mexico

Lateral transport of carbon by wind and water in the form of litter fall could represent a significant portion of carbon entering or exiting an ecosystem. In La Paz, Baja California Sur, Mexico, GCRG established a permanent Eddy Covariance tower in 2001. Eddy Covariance tracks daily, seasonal and yearly ecosystem carbon flux, but may . . . → Read More: Vertical and Lateral Carbon Flux in a Larrea/Cardon Ecosystem near La Paz, BCS, Mexico

Air-Sea CO2 Exchange in the Coastal Marine Zone

The objective of this study is to identify and describe the patterns of and controls on air-sea CO2 exchange at distinct geographic locations (eg, Barrow AK, Bodega Bay CA, San Diego CA) and understand important characteristics of physical and biological processes of the coastal sea.

Personnel: Hiroki Ikawa, Walt Oechel Duration: 2006 – present