For GCRG Only

Travel Protocol / Checklist

Shipping or Traveling with Equipment

[ carry-on? ] [ declare value? ]

Before Traveling

[ which forms? ]

After Traveling

[ which forms for reimbursement? ]

Impacts of Conversion and Drainage of Tropical Peat Forests on Carbon Fluxes to Atmosphere and Water

Indonesia has the largest tropical peats, ranging from 18 to 27 million hectares. It is estimated that about 12 million hectares of these peats have been disturbed and substantially drained in order to lower water table depths which are required for agricultural uses (i.e. rice paddy, industrial pulp, and recently oil palm plantation). Drained . . . → Read More: Impacts of Conversion and Drainage of Tropical Peat Forests on Carbon Fluxes to Atmosphere and Water

Mr-SPOC: Maintenance

SPOC, a.k.a. Mr-SPOC (single point of contact), is a network drive. It is a RAID consisting of multiple hard drives. Here is a snapshot of its info as of 2010-10-05:

Hostname: mr-spoc Model: ReadyNAS NV [X-RAID] Serial: 000da2011f1f Firmware: RAIDiator 4.1.6 [1.00a043] Memory: 1024 MB [2.5-3-3-7] IP address: 130.191.237.8 Volume C: Online, X-RAID, 4 . . . → Read More: Mr-SPOC: Maintenance

Seasonal and Inter-Annual Controls on CO2 Flux in Arctic Alaska

The Arctic landscape holds massive potential to affect the global carbon balance. Soils of the northern permafrost region account for approximately 50 percent of the estimated global below-ground organic carbon pool. The total soil organic carbon in the first 3 m in northern circumpolar permafrost, excluding yedoma, is ca.1024 PgC. Under a projected warmer . . . → Read More: Seasonal and Inter-Annual Controls on CO2 Flux in Arctic Alaska

GCRG Awarded DOE Grant to Operate Arctic Carbon Flux Towers

GCRG was awarded a grant by the US Department of Energy for the proposal, “Seasonal and Inter-Annual Controls on CO2 Flux in Arctic Alaska” (PI: Walt Oechel). The grant will allow GCRG to operate eddy covariance flux towers at Barrow, Atqasuk and Ivotuk for the next 3 years.

Read more about the project here.

Summer 2010 Field Report: Barrow, Alaska

Our 2010 summer research activities near Barrow were very successful. From July 1 to August 12, 2010  Ph.D. candidate Cove Sturtevant and assistant Tim Hubbard placed portable eddy covariance towers at 21 lake or vegetated drained lake features over a 150 square mile area near Barrow, Alaska. A total of three portable towers were . . . → Read More: Summer 2010 Field Report: Barrow, Alaska

Summer 2010 Field Report: La Paz, Mexico

During the summer of 2010 Master’s degree candidate Tom Bell completed his field research in the CIBNOR desert preserve near La Paz, BCS, Mexico. From June to August, Tom monitored lateral litter flux experiments, which had commenced in the summer of 2009. Collection of vertical and lateral litter traps was completed over two time . . . → Read More: Summer 2010 Field Report: La Paz, Mexico

GCRG Heads for the Skies with NASA-Funded Research

GCRG will work with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s Jet Propulsion Lab to measure the greenhouse gas effect on the Arctic. The research team will collect data that will provide unprecedented experimental insights into Arctic carbon cycling, especially the release of the important greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide and methane. The study . . . → Read More: GCRG Heads for the Skies with NASA-Funded Research

Seasonal Variations of Trace Gas Flux in Mangrove Ecosystem in Baja California Sur, Mexico

IMGA0110

Anthropogenic activities have disrupted biogeochemical cycles with subsequent increases in the emission of radiatively important trace gases. Wetlands are natural sources of CO2, CH4 and N2O with seasonal variations in anthropogenic inputs, temperature, salinity, and water modulating emissions. Variations in trace gas flux in mangrove ecosystems using eddy covariance, soil coring, leaf litter sampling, . . . → Read More: Seasonal Variations of Trace Gas Flux in Mangrove Ecosystem in Baja California Sur, Mexico

Land-atmosphere carbon fluxes along a thaw-lake chronosequence on the Arctic Coastal Plain of Alaska

Thaw lakes and vegetated thaw lake basins (VTLBs) are common features in permafrost zones and can comprise a large proportion of the land surface [1-7] (Figure 1). Thaw lakes on the Arctic Coastal Plain (ACP) of Alaska are estimated to have begun forming approximately 10,000 years ago in the Holocene when the climate was . . . → Read More: Land-atmosphere carbon fluxes along a thaw-lake chronosequence on the Arctic Coastal Plain of Alaska