For GCRG Only

GCRG awarded a new NSF grant “Campus Cyberinfrastructure: CC* Storage: Implementation of a Distributed, Shareable, and Parallel Storage Resource at San Diego State University to Facilitate High-Performance Computing for Climate Science”. 2017-2019. Co-PI: Aram Kalhori, PI: Christopher Paolini.

GCRG awarded a new NSF grant “Campus Cyberinfrastructure: CC* Storage: Implementation of a Distributed, Shareable, and Parallel Storage Resource at San Diego State University to Facilitate High-Performance Computing for Climate Science”. 2017-2019. Co-PI: Aram Kalhori, PI: Christopher Paolini.

GCRG awarded a new NSF grant “Methane at the ZERO CURTAIN” 2017-2020. PI: Donatella Zona

GCRG awarded NASA grant “Temporal and Spatial Patterns of and Controls on Arctic CO2 and CH4 Fluxes in the ABoVE Domain”. PI: Walter Oechel

“Biogeochemistry: Long-term effects of permafrost thaw” by Donatella Zona

http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v537/n7622/full/537625a.html

Carbon emissions from the Arctic tundra could increase drastically as global warming thaws permafrost. Clues now obtained about the long-term effects of such thawing on carbon dioxide emissions highlight the need for more data.

Subject terms:

Biogeochemistry, Climate change, Hydrology, Environmental sciences

“If San Diego lost its forest” by Walter Oechel

http://inewsource.org/2016/09/28/san-diego-forest-loss/

The forests of San Diego County that have shaded 500 generations of local people and provided pine needle bedding, oak woodland and spiritual renewal could disappear. Overly intense fires in quick succession, along with drought, borer insects and climate extremes is laying waste to trees and creating a hostile environment for regrowth.

Trees . . . → Read More: “If San Diego lost its forest” by Walter Oechel

The Washington Post interview with Dr. Zona and Dr. Oechel about cold-season methane emissions in the Arctic

Bad news: Scientists say we could be underestimating Arctic methane emissions

Arctic permafrost has become a recent star in the climate change conversation, capturing the attention of scientists, activists and policymakers alike because of its ability to emit large quantities of carbon dioxide as well as methane — a particularly potent though relatively short-lived . . . → Read More: The Washington Post interview with Dr. Zona and Dr. Oechel about cold-season methane emissions in the Arctic

GCRG awarded NSF grant towards the annual budget of CH4 emissions from tundra ecosystem across a latitudinal gradient

GCRG was awarded a grant by the US National Science Foundation for the proposal, “Methane loss from the Arctic: towards an annual budget of CH4 emissions from tundra ecosystem across a latitudinal gradient” (PI: Donatella Zona). In this research project we will measure CO2 and CH4 fluxes across a latitudinal transect in the arctic tundra . . . → Read More: GCRG awarded NSF grant towards the annual budget of CH4 emissions from tundra ecosystem across a latitudinal gradient

Assessing the spatial variability in peak season CO 2 exchange characteristics across the Arctic tundra using a light response curve parameterization

Assessing the spatial variability in peak season CO 2 exchange characteristics across the Arctic tundra using a light response curve parameterization.

Clicker here to read the article

Dr. Oechel was identified as some of the “World’s Most Influential Scientific Minds” by Thomson Reuters”

Oechel was ranked as a top influencer in the category of Agricultural Sciences for his long standing work on climate change as a plant eco-physiologist and systems ecologist.

Click here to read more